Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Search Course IDs and descriptions for:

Find complete words only

Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | PHYS107 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: PHYS107
COURSE TITLE:Physics-Heat/Magnetism
DIVISION:Sciences
IAI CODE(S): PHY 912
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:4
CONTACT HOURS:75
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:180
DELIVERY MODE:In-Person

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHYS107 is the second course in a three-semester introductory physics sequence for the engineering and science student. The typical student enrolling in this course will later transfer to a four-year college or university to continue their studies toward a baccalaureate degree in a scientific field.

PREREQUISITES:
PHYS106 and MATH130.

NOTES: A lab is required for this course. Some sections will require a separate lab, while other sections will include the lab.


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Compare and contrast thermodynamic and electromagnetic terminology using applicable formulae, units, and scientific vocabulary
  • Solve equations by identifying variables, interpreting the significance of the equations, and citing applications, as well as predicting (with justification) variations in results from changes in conditions, in the electromagnetic processes
  • Examine concepts by detailing the assumptions and limitations of the conceptual models as well as justifying corrective terms and signage for formulae used in electromagnetic processes
  • Apply electromagnetic concepts to multi-leveled, application problems that make use of diagramming, vector mathematics, derivatives, integrals, and the right-hand rule using correct signage, dimensional analysis, and justification for plausibility of the process (based on the standards given in a rubric)
  • Interpret graphical representations for functions and processes by extrapolating data or drawing conclusions about the electromagnetic process
  • Use proper laboratory and communication skills through experiments, industry projects, and produce lab reports that demonstrate competence in aspects of technical writing

TOPICAL OUTLINE:
Weekly Schedule:
Week Topic
1 Discussions and problems will involve electric charges, Coulombs’s Law, Electric Fields due to point charges
2 Discussions and problems will involve electric fields due continuous charges, electric flux, and Gauss’s Law.
3 Discussions and problems will involve applications of Gauss’s law, electric potential due to point charges and due to a continuous charge distribution.
4 Relationship between electric potential and electric field examined. Review of unit 1
5 Discussions and problems will involve Electric capacitance and dielectrics, energy stored in a capacitor. Exam 1
6 Discussions and problems will involve conduction, electric current, resistance, and electric power for direct current
7 Discussions and problems will involve electromotive force, models of resistors in series and parallel circuits, and Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws.
8 Discussions and problems will involve resistor – capacitor circuits and associated time constants for direct current. Review of unit 2
9 Discussions and problems will involve magnetic fields, forces exerted on moving charges in a magnetic field, the motion of charges in a magnetic field and magnetic forces acting on a current carrying wire,. Exam 2
10 Discussions and problems will involve torque on a loop of wire in a uniform magnetic field, the Hall effect the Biot-Savart law and Ampere’s law.
11 Discussions and problems will involve the magnetic field in a solenoid, Gauss’s law in magnetism, and ferromagnetism.
12 Discussions and problems will involve Faraday’s law of induction, Lenz’s law and induced emf. Review of unit 3
13 Discussions and problems will involve inductors in circuits with resistors, oscillations in circuits with inductors and capacitors, and RLC circuits. Exam 3
14 Discussions and problems will involve analysis of resistors, capacitors and inductors individually and in combination in AC circuits and power in AC circuits.
15 Discussions and problems will involve transformers, Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
16 Review of unit 4, Exam 4

Lab Activities:
Lab Activities
Activity Title Description of Lab Student Outcome Delivery Time
Coulomb’s Law part 1 Two nonconductive spheres are charged and brought to varying distances. The force between the spheres is measured via a torsion balance. A graph of force vs distance is made in Excel After completing this lab students will be able to verify that the force between two objects increases as the square of the decrease of the distance between two charged objects Hands on 2 hrs
Coulomb’s Law part 2 Two nonconductive spheres are kept at a set distance. Trials of varying charge are performed and the force between the two spheres measured via a torsion balance. A graph of force verses the product of the charges is created in Excel. After completing this lab students will be able to show that the force between two spheres is proportional to the product of the charge of the spheres. Hands on 2 hrs
Measuring Electric Fields The electric field lines of different configurations of charged areas is graphed using a current meter. After completing this lab students will illustrate the electric field surrounding simple configurations. Hands on 2 hrs
Milikan’s Oil Drop A simulation of the oil drop experiment is used to determine the charge of an electron After completing this lab students will be able to explain that charges come in discrete amounts. Simulation 2 hrs
Ohm’s Law The voltage and current passing through a single resistor is measured for different resistances. A graph of Current vs Voltage is created and analyzed. Multiple resistors are arranged in series and then parallel circuits and the resistance measured. After completing this lab students will be able to show that voltage and current are directly proportional, and the equivalent resistances of series and parallel circuits. Hands on 2 hrs
Kirchhoff’s current Law The current through each branch of a parallel circuit is measured. Experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions. After completing this lab students will be able to explain Kirchhoff’s current law. Hands on 2 hrs
Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law The voltage across each resistor of a circuit that contains series and parallel components. Experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions. After completing this lab students will be able to explain Kirchhoff’s voltage law. Hands on 2 hrs
Wheatstone bridge A Wheatstone bridge is used to measure an unknown resistances using a known resistor and the ratio of two lengths of current carrying wire After completing this lab students will be able to explain that the resistance of a wire is proportional to its legth. Hands on 2 hrs
Current Balance a current balance is used to investigate the relationship between current and magnetic forces After completing this lab students will be able to explain the relationship between current and magnetic field. Hands on 2 hrs
Motion of charge in a magnetic field Electrons are force through a magnetic field. The arc of their path measured. Known electric and magnetic fields allow the calculation of the ratio. After completing this lab students will be able to explain the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field. Hands on 2 hrs
Magnetic Induction The magnetic induction of a coil of wires is measured at different positions and distances around a long straight current carrying wire. After completing this lab students will be able to explain the relationship between distance and magnetic strength. Hands on 2 hrs
Capacitor charging and discharging Individual capacitors are wired in series with various resistors and the charging and discharging times are measured. Capacitors are connected in series and parallel and the capacitance measured. After completing this lab students will be able to explain and use the time constant of capacitors, and calculate equivalent capacitance. Simulation 2 hrs
Inductors in DC circuits Students will measure voltage and time for charging in DC circuits with inductors and resistors connected in series After completing this lab students will be able to explain and calculate the time constant of inductors Hands on 2 hrs
Operating a Oscilloscope The set up and use of an oscilloscope is explained and explored with simple resistive and capacitance circuits to measure, voltage, frequency and periods. After completing this lab students will be able to operate an oscilloscope to analyze simple AC circuits Hands on 2 hrs
RLC Circuits An oscilloscope is used to analyze a circuit with inductors and capacitors. After completing this lab students will be able to explain the time constants associated with RLC circuits Hands on 2 hrs
Total lab contact hours: 30


TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 9th Edition, Richard Serway, 2010.
Web access required.

See bookstore website for current book(s) at https://www.dacc.edu/bookstore

EVALUATION:

The classroom’s main activity is lecture interspersed with discussion. Problems are assigned to be completed and checked by the students. Examinations are given to evaluate the student’s level of understanding the material. In addition, each student is required to participate in a weekly laboratory exercise related to the lecture topic being covered, and is graded according to a written report, experimental technique, quality of results, and participation. Students will also be performing several presentations.

The main emphasis of the course is to learn to analyze problems and to be able to apply the proper equations and mathematical procedures to obtain a suitable solution. Students will be assessed with (3) three major exams, a final, lab reports, industry projects, quizzes and other homework.

Grading Criteria:
Evaluation--3 exams
Writing--lab reports
Industry Projects--testing & designing projects includes budget report, letters, memos, etc.
Citizenship--quizzes, homework, etc
Final--exam covering all material from the semester
40%
20%
10%
10%
20%

Grading Scale:
A= 90-100
B= 80-89.9
C= 70-79.9
D= 60-69.9
F= Below 60

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://www.dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 103. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Spring 2020

Upcoming Events