Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | CRIM202 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: CRIM202
COURSE TITLE:Laws of Evidence
DIVISION:Liberal Arts
IAI CODE(S): CRJ 192
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:4
CONTACT HOURS:180
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:
DELIVERY MODE:Campus, Face to Face

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Review of rules, constitutional provisions, and court decisions relating to admissibility of evidence.

PREREQUISITES:
Place into ENGL121.

NOTES:

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
This course is designed to present the student with the basic concepts of criminal evidence as it applies to the criminal justice workplace.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the trial process including the role of evidence which will be measured by student exams and quizzes.

The student will develop critical thinking skills in regards to the types of evidence used during the trial process and will show this understanding through class participation by directly answering questions and follow up questions during lectures/discussions.

The student will demonstrate the knowledge of what evidence is acceptable or not acceptable during a trial and this will be assessed through class participation in the same manner as listed above. The student will recognize the importance of evidence and how the outcome of a trial is influenced by evidence. This will be measured by a research paper which will show the student’s understanding of the use of evidence during a trial.


TOPICAL OUTLINE:
  • Week 1:  Introduction / General Information Chapter 1: Introduction to the Law of Evidence and the Pretrial Process.  Read Chapter 2 and 3.
  •  Week 2:  Chapter 2: The Trial Process Chapter 3: Evidence – Basic Concepts.  Read Chapter 4.
  • Week 3:  Quiz – Chapters 1, 2, and 3 Chapter 4: Witnesses.  Read Chapter 5 and 6.
  • Week 4:  Chapter 5: Witnesses-Lay and Expert.  Chapter 6: Credibility and Impeachment.
  • Week 5:  Quiz – Chapters 4, 5, 6.  Guest Speaker – VMEG.  Read Chapter 7 and 8.
  • Week 6:  Chapter 7: The Hearsay Rule.  Chapter 8: Opposing Party’s Statements.  Read Chapter 9.
  •  Week 7:  Chapter 9: Search and Seizure.  Work on research papers.  Read Chapter 10.
  • Week 8:  Quiz – Chapters 7, 8, 9.  Chapter 10: Identification Procedures.  Read Chapter 11.
  • Week 9:  Chapter 11: Circumstantial Evidence.
  • Week 10:  Quiz – Chapters 10, 11.  Guest Speaker.  Read Chapter 12.
  • Week 11:  Chapter 12: Documentary Evidence and Discovery.  Read Chapter 13.
  • Week 12:  Chapter 13: Physical Evidence.  Read Chapter 14.
  • Week 13:  Quiz – Chapters 12, 13.  Chapter 14: Photographic, Recorded, and Computer-generated evidence.  Read Chapter 15.
  • Week 14:  Chapter 15: How to Testify Effectively.  Complete Research Paper.
  • Week 15:  Quiz – Chapters 14, 15.  Research papers due.
  • Week 16:  Review for final examination.  Study for final.
  • Week 17:  Final Examination.

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:
Criminal Evidence, 7th edition, Norman M. Garland ISBN: 978-0078026614

See bookstore website for current book(s) at http://www.dacc.bkstr.com

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss your specific needs. Students with disabilities should contact the Student Support Services Center (SSSC) to request academic accommodations including alternative testing arrangements, note takers, interpreters, taped/large-print books, and other resources. The SSSC is located on the first floor of Cannon Hall. For more information call (217) 443-8702 (TTY 217.443.8701). Please note that accommodations cannot be provided until the proper documentation is on file with the SSSC.

ATTENDANCE AND WITHDRAWAL POLICY:
Class attendance is required. I will occasionally have guest speakers. Most of the test material will cover your text AND my lectures. Students absent for more than two classes may be dropped from the class. I will assume no responsibility to drop a student from the class. If a student quits attending and does not drop, an “F” grade should be expected.

STUDENT CONDUCT AND ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY:
Any cheating will result in the student failing the test/or class, or be dropped. Please do your own work. I expect everyone to respect themselves and others. See student handbook for guidelines on behavior and student conduct.


EVALUATION:
Final grades will be determined by the completion of all assignments.

100-90% = A

  89-80% = B

  79-70% = C

  69-60% = D

  59-00% = F

30 points = six quizzes worth five points each
30 points = final examination
30 points = research paper
10 points = by directly answering questions and follow-up questions during lecture/discussions

The quizzes will consist of 20 questions each which will include multiple choice and true/false questions. The final examination will consist of 60 questions each which will consist of multiple choice, true/false, and fill in the blank. The quizzes and final examination will cover all material presented including lectures, guest speakers, films, practical exercises, and chapter readings.

Missed quizzes must be made up prior to the next scheduled class session. It is your responsibility to contact me as soon as possible after your absence. Email me for instructions on how to make up your exam.

RESEARCH PAPER:
The student will choose a criminal case and write a research paper that includes a summary of the case and how evidence played a role in the outcome of the case. The case may be a well-known case or one the student has intimate knowledge of. Email me if you have specific questions or would like my opinion of the case you choose.

The paper will be seven to ten pages long, including a title page and bibliography. The paper will be typed in Times New Roman with a 12 point font, double spaced, and one inch margins. The writing style is at the discretion of the student.

Social Science Grading Rubric

"A" – Excellent Essays

  • Use specific and accurate terms and concepts throughout the essay.
  • Use complete sentences and paragraphs.
  • Have a clear introduction and conclusion.
  • Present and support a specific thesis throughout the essay.
  • Provide a thoughtful and supported opinion when appropriate.
  • Demonstrate excellent skills in organization and mechanics.
  • Present direct answers to all phases of the question asked
  • Demonstrates excellent use of qualitative and quantitative analysis when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates excellent use of proper citations when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates excellent use of electronic and traditional resource when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates excellent use evidence of understanding cultural and global contexts when appropriate.
"B" – Good Essays
  • Use accurate terms and concepts throughout the essay.
  • Use complete sentences and paragraphs.
  • Have an introduction and a conclusion.
  • Present a thesis and have some support throughout the essay.
  • Provide a thoughtful and supported opinion when appropriate.
  • Demonstrate good skills in organization and mechanics.
  • Present answers to all phases of the question asked.
  • Demonstrates good use of qualitative and quantitative analysis when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates good use of proper citations when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates good use of electronic and traditional resources when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates good evidence of understanding cultural and global contexts when appropriate.
"C" – Average Essays
  • Use few accurate terms and concepts.
  • Use complete sentences and paragraphs.
  • Have an introduction or a conclusion.
  • Present a thesis but have little support.
  • Provide a thoughtful opinion without support.
  • Demonstrate some skills in organization and mechanics.
  • Present some answers to the questions asked.
  • Demonstrates some use of qualitative and quantitative analysis when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates some use of proper citations when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates some use of electronic and traditional resources when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates some evidence of understanding cultural and global contexts when appropriate.
"D"- Below Average Essays
  • Use few or no terms and concepts.
  • Use some complete sentences and paragraphs.
  • Have no introduction or conclusion.
  • Present disjointed ideas without a thesis or support.
  • Provide little or no opinion when asked.
  • Demonstrate few skills in organization and mechanics.
  • Present few direct answers to the question asked.
  • Demonstrates little use of qualitative and quantitative analysis when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates little use of proper citations when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates little use of electronic and traditional resources when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates little evidence of understanding cultural and global contexts when appropriate.
"F"- Essays
  • Use no terms or concepts.
  • Use few complete sentences and paragraphs.
  • Have no introduction or conclusion.
  • Present disjointed ideas with no support.
  • Provide no opinion when asked.
  • Demonstrate no skills in organization and mechanics.
  • Present only a couple of answers to the questions asked
  • Demonstrates no use of qualitative and quantitative analysis when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates no use of proper citations when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates no use of electronic and traditional resources when appropriate.
  • Demonstrates no evidence of understanding cultural and global contexts when appropriate.


BIBLIOGRAPHY:

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 113. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Fall 2017

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