Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Areas of Study | | BIOL136 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: BIOL136
COURSE TITLE:Anatomy and Physiology I
DIVISION:Sciences
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:4
CONTACT HOURS:90
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:180
DELIVERY MODE:In-Person, Hybrid

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
An introduction to anatomy and physiology with survey of the cell, tissues, introductory chemistry, and methods of transport across membranes. Systemic approach to anatomy and physiology with the skeletal as the first system followed by the muscular and nervous systems. Cadaver utilized for instruction. 3 hours of lecture, 2 and 1/2 hours of laboratory per week.

PREREQUISITES:
Placement into MATH107 and ENGL101.

NOTES:

BIOL102 with a grade of C or better is strongly recommended.

A lab is required for this course.

Anyone taking BIOL136 with BIOL140 during the same semester should be a strong student with good study habits and adequate study time.

Anatomy and physiology is a rigorous class and students will need to allow for sufficient study time. Students may need time outside of class to study in the lab.



STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the human body from the chemical level to the systematic level.
  • Define anatomical terminology and describe the basic organization and basic chemical principles of the human body.
  • Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.
  • Identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person.
  • Apply anatomy and physiological principles to explain human health and disease
  • Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively as a member of a team.
  • Demonstrate proper use of lab equipment.

TOPICAL OUTLINE:
  • Introduction to human anatomy and physiology:
    • Homeostasis, anatomical terminology, planes and sections. 5%
  • Chemistry:
    • Basic chemistry concepts. Major organic molecules and their characteristics. 5%
  • Cells:
    • Cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, organelles. 3%
  • Cell Physiology:
    • Methods of transport (ex. diffusion, osmosis, active transport, etc.) cell cycle, ATP synthesis glycolysis, citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, protein synthesis. 6%
  • Tissues:
    • Detail study of the four major tissues and examples, membranes, glands. 8%
  • Integumentary System:
    • Layers in skin, accessory organs, skin cancer, wounds, healing, and burns. 10%
  • Skeletal System:
    • Bone structure and growth. Bone physiology including hormones, vitamins, and the healing of broken bones and bone disease. 6%
    • Axial and appendicular skeleton: All bones of human body and most of their features. 6%
    • Functions of bones, bone diseases, bone fractures. Articulations: major categories, subtypes, and movements. Special structures associated with diarthrotic joints. 6%
  • Muscular System:
    • Anatomy of muscle fiber and whole muscle. Physiology of muscle contraction: neuromuscular junction, conduction of action potential, myosin and actin interaction, energy sources for contraction. 5%
    • Muscle twitch, treppe, tetany, fatigue, tonus, isometric, isotonic contraction plus various clinical disorders utilized to highlight normal physiology. 5%
    • Origin and insertion. Introduction to muscle and actions. 3%
    • Location and actions of many specific human muscles. 3%
  • Nervous System I:
    • Neuron: anatomy and physiology: action potential, conduction of nerve impulse, and inhibition by hyperpolarization. Synapse: transmission of impulse and factors affecting transmission. 13%
  • Nervous System II:
    • Spinal cord anatomy and physiology including functions of selected tracts. Reflexes and how abnormal reflexes can be used to diagnose nerve damage 5%
    • Brain centers their locations and functions. Meninges, cerebrospinal fluid, ventricles. Disease associated with the brain and symptoms. 3%
    • Peripheral nervous system including cranial nerves spinal nerves and plexuses. Major nerves within peripheral nervous system. 3%
    • Autonomic nervous system: contrasting sympathetic vs. parasympathetic divisions with regard to location, innervation, neurotransmitters, and effects on visceral organs. 5%

Weekly Lab Outline 136 Anatomy and Physiology:
Students must demonstrate that they are able to:

Lab Text/Manual Title: Laboratory Investigations in Anatomy & Physiology: Main Version, Benjamin Cummings
Activity Title: Description of Lab: Student Outcome/Skills: Delivery Method: Activity Time (hrs)
Lab 1: Anatomical Terminology Define specific anatomical terms; Describe anatomical position. Use anatomical terms of comparison with torso models and skeletons.

Identify body cavities, associated organs and membranes. Determine which organs may be found in each of the abdominal quadrants or in each of the nine abdominal regions. Define anatomical planes and sections. Demonstrate microscope focusing skills. Identify microscope parts and describe their functions.
Define anatomical terminology and describe the basic organization and basic chemical principles of the human body. Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 2: The Cell Provide details on the structure and organization of the plasma membrane. Identify major cells, organelles, and their functions. Identify the stages of mitosis using compound microscope and describe the stages of mitosis. After viewing lab demonstrations describe the characteristics of various membrane transport systems. Demonstrate an understanding of tonicity. Demonstrate proper use of lab equipment.

Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.
Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 3: Tissues Focus the microscope on specific tissues. Draw these tissues and specific structures and characteristics. Describe the characteristics (structure, function, location) of epithelial, connective, muscle, and nerve tissues. Recognize examples of each tissue and specific structures using the compound microscope. Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 4: Axial Skeleton Identify the bones of the axial skeleton and their landmarks using bones and skeletons provided. Explain the functions of some of these landmarks. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 5: Appendicular Skeleton Identify the bones of the appendicular skeleton and their landmarks using bones and skeletons provided. Explain the functions of some of these landmarks. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 6: Joints & Movement Categorize joints according to their structure and movement. Describe and be able to identify examples of the different types of joints using skeletons and models. Identify specific joint structures. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 7: Lab Practical Demonstrate competency in lab material (lab 1 through 6)   Exam 2.5
Lab 8: Muscle location and layering Construct muscle layering and origin and insertion using clay modeling and special skeletal models. Students will be given a specific muscle list. Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively as a member of a team. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 9: Muscle Location Identify the major muscles on cadavers and models. See lab muscle list. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 10: Muscle Physiology Understand muscle physiology and actions; explain the motor unit and the functional significance of motor unit recruitment. Recognize and define isotonic and isometric contractions. Evaluate the range of motion of various joints and interpret the data. Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 11: The Central Nervous System Explain the general organization of the nervous system and structure of a neuron. Identify brain anatomy using sheep brain dissection and models. Understand spinal cord function. Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 12: The Peripheral Nervous System Identify the major nerves and the muscles they innervate using cadavers and models. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 13: Nerve Physiology Describe the human homunculus.

Assess the density of sensory receptors and the function of spinal nerves using the two point discrimination test. Collect data and interpret results. Draw and explain the reflex-arc. Correctly perform reflex tests on others and interpret results.
Explain the complex physiological interactions at the cellular, histological, and gross levels of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Demo & Hands-on 2.5
Lab 14: Muscles and Nerves They Innervate Identify muscles and nerves using cadavers and models. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 15: Review Lab Review Muscles and nerves using cadavers and models. Locate, identify, and correctly spell human anatomical structures for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems on models, bones, cadavers and on a living person. Hands-on 2.5
Lab 16: Lab Practical Demonstrate competency in lab material (labs 8-13)   Exam 2.5
Total lab contact hours: 40

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Shier, David, Jackie Butler, & Ricki Lewis (2014). Hole's Human Anatomy and Physiology, 14th Edition. Dubuque: Wm. C. Brown.

Laboratory Manual: Sarikas (2010). Laboratory Investigations in Anatomy & Physiology: Main Version, Benjamin Cummings, or self-written handouts.

Supplemental packets or notes prepared by instructors.

Teaching aids:
Human cadavers, microscopes and prepared microscope slides, articulated and disarticulated human bones, human brains; wall charts, models, prepared transparencies, videos of cadavers, website provided by McGraw Hill, and assorted software programs.


EVALUATION:
4 Lecture Exams
Lab Practicals
Quizzes in Lecture or Lab
Lab Activities and Assignments
1 Comprehensive (Lab and Lecture Material) Final Exam
45%
25%
5%
5%
20%

Grading Scale:
A- 90%-100%
B- 80%-89%
C- 70%-79%
D- 60%-69%
F- Below 60%

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://www.dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 103. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Fall 2019

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